Spaced out Dropfleet – How does Dropfleet Commander manage massive multiplayer battles?

This years New Years’ hootenanny for us was a Dropfleet commander table crasher.

Our little gaming group have had the tradition of throwing together something big at the beginning of year, just before everything else takes off again after the holidays and people are lost in the work. Previously it as been different forms of Apocalypses or mini-campaigns or final warhammer fantasy battles in some longer linked game thing we’ve run.

Captain Starfleet among us has led the Dropfleet Commander arms race (dare I say Dropzone as well?), while we others struggle even painting the little we have. He’s been heard suggesting all matters of large scale drop offs, so it was time to humour him. In the end we were but four players but I think that was for the best.

Losing both a Smug Dolphin Society (PHR – just look at those profiles) and Chaos Beakie’s Scourgy Dogs we ended up with a mere 5000 points-ish per side. Captain Starfleet on one side with three UCM fleets of 1500, 1500 and 2000 (with a Dreadnought), me smuggling Pungari for the Hodgepodge Tribes, Dolph Pupbeard (formerly known as Beardy McDwarfpup) with PHR and Mr. Easter organizing his space faring club-men into some form of meat shield.

How did it go then?
It seemed to be a good plan to divide the fleets into equal parts on both sides. Captain Starfleet was in a bit of trouble keeping track of all of his battlegroups, and in the pre-battle phase (following Dave’s naming) colour coding his fleet with straws. For once, unlike in those mega-apocalyptic games of 40k, there was stuff to do every once in a while for all players making time run much smoother. And, while we were three on one side organising the acting order of our fleet didn’t take ages (simply randomising most of the deck except for the first and last few cards was a hit – we blamed it on problems in communicating).

Our plan was to try to tackle the UCM London dreadnought with the crippling battleships of the PHR and the Shaltari. In the end, it they hindered the London-classer to do anything proper (a part from showing of Captain Starfleet’s dice rolling skills – which were epic, I tell you). But they didn’t get to do too much in return.

 

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